Protect Your Income with Long Term Disability Insurance

 

Long term disability insurance is a type of insurance policy that provides financial support to individuals who become disabled and unable to work for an extended period of time. The coverage typically lasts until the individual reaches retirement age or is able to return to work.

Although most workers can be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or workers’ compensation, SSDI typically takes three to four months for a claim to be processed and workers’ compensation insurance will only cover work-related injuries or illness.

 

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Whether or not it is worth it depends on your ability to pay for living expenses if you should become disabled due to an injury or illness until your SSDI benefits kick in.

 

What is Long Term Disability Insurance?

Long-term disability insurance is a type of insurance policy designed to provide financial support to individuals who become disabled and unable to work for an extended period of time. The coverage typically lasts until the individual reaches retirement age or is able to return to work.

The policy provides a portion of the individual’s income to help them meet their financial obligations and maintain their standard of living during a disability. Long-term disability insurance can be purchased by individuals or offered as a benefit by employers.

The premiums are usually paid by the policyholder, but in some cases, they may be partially or fully covered by the employer. The policy is designed to act as a safety net in the event of a disabling injury or illness, providing financial security and peace of mind during a difficult time.

 

Is there a Waiting Period before I can Start Getting Benefits?

Yes, most long-term disability insurance policies come with a waiting period before benefits will start being paid. The waiting period is usually referred to as the elimination period and is the amount of time that must pass before the policyholder is eligible to receive benefits. The elimination period is usually between 30 and 90 days and can be longer or shorter depending on the policy and the policyholder’s specific needs.

During the elimination period, the policyholder is typically responsible for paying their own bills and meeting their financial obligations. Once the elimination period is exhausted, the policyholder can start receiving benefits if they are still unable to work due to their disability.

The length of the elimination period is one of the factors that can affect the cost of the policy, with longer elimination periods generally leading to lower premiums and vice versa. When choosing a long-term disability insurance policy, it’s important to consider the elimination period and how it aligns with your specific needs and financial situation.

 

How much Long-Term Disability Insurance can I Buy?

The amount of disability coverage you can get with a long-term disability insurance policy depends on several factors, including your income, the policy’s maximum benefit limit, and the coverage options you choose. Most policies will provide a portion of your income, typically between 40% and 70%, depending on the policy and the policyholder’s specific needs.

It’s important to consider your current income and future financial needs when determining the amount of coverage you need. Some factors to consider include your monthly bills, debt obligations, and any dependents you may have. In general, it’s recommended to aim for a level of coverage that will allow you to maintain your standard of living if you become disabled and unable to work.

Keep in mind that the maximum benefit limit of a long-term disability insurance policy can vary depending on the policy and the insurance company. Some policies may have a maximum benefit limit of $10,000 per month, while others may offer a maximum benefit limit of $20,000 or more.

 

Will my Benefits be Taxable?

Whether or not your long-term disability insurance benefits are taxable depends on how the policy was funded and how the benefits are paid out. In general, there are two types of long-term disability insurance policies: employer-sponsored policies and individual policies.

If your long-term disability insurance is an employer-sponsored policy, the benefits you receive may be taxable if the premiums for the policy were paid using pre-tax dollars. In this case, the benefits would be considered taxable income and would be subject to federal and state income taxes.

If you purchased an individual long-term disability insurance policy, the benefits you receive are generally considered tax-free. However, this is subject to change if new legislation is enacted, so it’s always a good idea to check with a tax professional or the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for the most up-to-date information.

In either case, it’s important to keep accurate records of your long-term disability insurance benefits and to seek the advice of a tax professional if you have any questions about the tax implications of your benefits.

 

Are the rates different for a Blue-Collar worker versus a Professional?

Yes, the rates for long-term disability insurance can vary based on the occupation of the policyholder. Typically, blue-collar workers and professionals are rated differently due to differences in their job duties and the risk of disability associated with their occupations.

Blue-collar workers, such as manual laborers and tradespeople, often have physically demanding jobs that carry a higher risk of injury or disability. As a result, their long-term disability insurance rates may be higher than those of professionals, such as office workers or managers, who generally have a lower risk of disability.

Additionally, some insurance companies may use different underwriting criteria for blue-collar workers and professionals. For example, a blue-collar worker may be required to undergo a medical exam as part of the underwriting process, while a professional may not. The insurance company will take into consideration the policyholder’s occupation and overall health when determining the rates for a long-term disability insurance policy.

 

What about Pre-existing Conditions?

Preexisting conditions can impact the availability and cost of long-term disability insurance coverage. A preexisting condition is a health issue or medical condition that existed before the policy was purchased.

When applying for long-term disability insurance, the insurance company will typically review the policyholder’s medical history and may ask about any preexisting conditions. If a policyholder has a preexisting condition, the insurance company may still provide coverage, but at a higher premium or with exclusions or limitations on coverage.

It’s important to disclose any and all preexisting conditions when applying for long-term disability insurance coverage. Failure to disclose a preexisting condition could result in a denial of benefits if the policyholder becomes disabled and files a claim.

If you have a preexisting condition, it’s important to compare coverage and rates from multiple insurance companies and to work with a knowledgeable insurance agent or financial advisor who can help you find the right coverage for your specific needs. Keep in mind that some insurance companies may be more willing to cover a preexisting condition than others and that the cost of coverage can vary greatly depending on the insurance company, the policyholder’s age and health, and the terms of the policy.

 

Does a Claim have to be Work-Related?

No, a claim for long-term disability insurance benefits does not necessarily have to be work-related. Long-term disability insurance is designed to provide financial protection if you become unable to work due to a non-work-related injury or illness.

In general, long-term disability insurance policies cover a wide range of disabilities, including both on-the-job and off-the-job injuries and illnesses. This can include conditions such as back injuries, heart disease, cancer, and other disabilities that prevent you from working.

It’s important to understand the specific terms and conditions of your long-term disability insurance policy, including any exclusions or limitations on coverage. Some policies may exclude certain conditions, such as pre-existing conditions or disabilities caused by substance abuse.

If you have a long-term disability insurance policy and become unable to work, you will need to file a claim with your insurance company. The claim process typically involves providing proof of your disability and information about your medical history, treatment, and prognosis.

 

What are the Rates Based On?

The rates for long-term disability insurance are primarily based on several factors, including:

Age: Younger policyholders typically pay lower rates for long-term disability insurance, as they are generally considered to be in better health and have a lower risk of disability.Occupation: As mentioned earlier, the rates for long-term disability insurance can vary based on the policyholder’s occupation, with blue-collar workers generally paying higher rates due to the higher risk of disability associated with physically demanding jobs.Health: The insurance company will take into account the policyholder’s overall health and medical history when determining the rates for a long-term disability insurance policy. Policyholders with pre-existing medical conditions or a history of health problems may pay higher rates.Coverage amount: The amount of long-term disability insurance coverage you choose will impact your rates. The more coverage you purchase, the higher your rates will be.Policy terms: The length of the benefit period and the elimination period (the amount of time you must wait before benefits begin) can impact the rates for long-term disability insurance.Location: Insurance rates can vary by state, with some states having higher rates due to factors such as a higher cost of living or a higher prevalence of disabilities.

It’s important to compare rates from multiple insurance companies and to work with a knowledgeable insurance agent or financial advisor to find the best policy for your specific needs and budget. Keep in mind that the cost of long-term disability insurance can vary greatly depending on the insurance company, policy terms, and policyholder’s age, health, and occupation.

 

The Bottom Line

The bottom line regarding long-term disability insurance is really quite simple. Unless you have significant savings or other liquid assets available to you if you become disabled and cannot work, purchasing Long-Term Disability Insurance may be the only thing standing between your assets, savings, 404(k) and bankruptcy.

Is Long Term Disability Insurance Worth it? You bet it is! Contact us at 866-868-0099 for more information and a free no-obligation quote or contactc us through our website at your convenience.

 

Protect Your Income with Long Term Disability Insurance

The post Is Long Term Disability Insurance Worth It? appeared first on Lifeinsure.com.

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